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believe to be a terrorist act, against our consulate in benghazi on the 11th anniversary of the attacks of september 11. these attacks do many things, but they remind us i think first of the bravery and commitment of government officials who serve in countries around the world, supporting the struggles of people in those countries, to live free. and by doing so work to improve our own national security. the attack in libya also reminds us that even though the core of al qaeda has been seriously weakened, we still face threats from an evolving and fractious set of terrorist groups and individuals united by a common ideology which is that of haven't -- violent islamist extremism. i'll have some questions to ask the three of you about the nature of the terrorist threat today and specifically with regard to the reaction to this film whether you think it has raised the threat level against any places or institutions or individuals here in the united states. reporting to us on the terrorist threat to the homeland today, i also hope you'll address other concerns such as the effort to counter h
of their bag of tactics to come at us, i think is still an open question. >> [inaudible] your sense of benghazi now, and a couple of things i want to discuss. was there discussion of putting marines at the compound to help secure it? what is your assessment and analysis of al qaeda and affiliate's or inspired organizations, their ability to assemble and generate an attack capability of this sort very rapidly? and for the united states to openly have no sense that it needed to provide the security to meet that potential threat. what does it say to you about al qaeda abilities in that region? >> first of all, with regards to benghazi, we responded to a request to provide a fast team to go into tripoli and provide additional security there, and we responded to that. at that point, for all intents and purposes, benghazi had been pretty much unoccupied by any of the diplomatic and other security personnel that were there. the main focus then was on tripoli and the embassy in tripoli, and that is what we responded to. with regards to al qaeda and its efforts in that area, i think it is fair to say th
dozen bills on the agenda today, including one honoring the diplomats killed in libya, in benghazi last week, and the re-authorization today of the federal emergency management agency. live coverage here on c-span at 2:00 p.m. eastern. host: the chair of the hamilton county, ohio, democratic party, tim. in cincinnati. and the republican party chair, alexander, from hamilton county. and from columbus, ohio, is jim, the political correspondent for wbnf-tv, the cbs affiliate in that city. gentlemen, thank you very much for being with us. jim heath, let me begin with you. hamilton county, ohio, has traditionally been a republican county, 1968 through 2004, a traditional republican county. in 2008 it went democratic. barack obama winning by 29,000 votes. what changed? >> well, a lot of republicans moved out of hamilton county into surrounding counties, steve, but there's one thing for certain in this election like past elections, the southwestern corner of ohio will be pivotal for mitt romney. he's got to get that back. he's got to perform better in hamilton county than john mccain did four
. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, a riding on a cargo ship. as america's representative, we helped the libyan people. as they cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. libyans held elections and built new institutions. and began to move forward after decades of dictatorship. chris stevens loved his work. he took pride in the country he served. he saw dignity in the people that he met. two weeks ago he traveled to benghazi to review plans to establish a new cultural center and modernize a hospital. that is one of america's compound came under attack. along with three of his colleagues, chris was killed, in the city he helped save. he was 52 years old. i tell you this story because chris stevens embodied the best of america. like his fellow foreign service officers, he build bridges across cultures and was deeply invested in the international cooperation that the united nations represents. he acted with humility but also stood up for a set of principles, a belief that individuals should be free to de
in benghazi were attacks on america. we are grateful for the assistance we receive from the libyan government and from the libyan people. there should be no doubt that we will be relentless in tracking down the killers and bringing them to justice. i also appreciate that in recent days, the leaders of other countries in the region, including egypt, tunisia, and yemen, have taken steps to secure our diplomatic facilities. and so have religious authorities around the world. but, understand that the attacks of the last two weeks are not simply an assault on america. there are also an assault on the very ideals upon which the united nations was founded. the notion that people can resolve their differences peacefully. diplomacy can take the place of work. -- diplomacy can take the place of war. all of us have a stake in working for a greater opportunity for our citizens. if we are serious about upholding these ideals, it will not be enough to put more guards in front of an embassy or to put out statements of regret and wait for the outrage to pass. we are serious about these ideals. we must speak
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5